Welcome, Guest
Username: Password: Secret Key Remember me

TOPIC: Did you know ?

Re: Did you know ? 7 years 7 months ago #58

  • M8trix
  • M8trix's Avatar
  • Offline
  • Administrator
  • Posts: 79
  • Karma: 0
Did you know

The original 1954 movie Godzilla was produced in Japan entirely in Japanese. This version we all know and love stars a young Raymond Burr (before he became Perry Mason or Ironside).

However, the original Japanese version did not include Burr’s character; Burr was added later for the American audience. Only his lips (and those of other actors in his specific scenes) actually mouth English; all other actors in the movie were speaking Japanese.

There is never a scene with Burr AND the other major actors together, as his role was spliced in later. Nor is Burr ever shown with Godzilla in the same scene.


www.spiritone.com/~brucem/trivgod.htm
The administrator has disabled public write access.

Did you know ? 7 years 7 months ago #57

  • M8trix
  • M8trix's Avatar
  • Offline
  • Administrator
  • Posts: 79
  • Karma: 0
A fun type of trivia game that starts with the word Did you know ? Topics to stick with are things of course Sci Fi , Horror , and fantasy and you can sneak in some other trivia that loosely hook into the theme if you want.

Some halloween Did you knows I found from the site [url=p://www.wyrdwords.vispa.com/halloween/history/index.html]The heretical history of Halloween[/url]

Did you know ?
The medieval Catholic focus on the dead at the time of All Hallows Eve is at the root of Halloween as we know it.. By the fourteenth century a custom called 'souling' had developed in England in which the poor would go from house to house asking for soul-cakes. The better-off would give out small cakes or loaves in exchange for prayers for their dead relatives. Souling continued up until the twentieth century in some parts of Britain, though the ritual became increasingly secularised and was eventually relegated to children. Souling almost certainly forms the basis for American 'Trick or Treating'. Shakespeare uses the phrase 'to speak pulling like a beggar at Hallowmass'.

During the mid sixteenth century the Protestant Reformation put a stop to All Souls Day rituals in England --or at least drove them underground. The Protestants denied the Catholic belief in purgatory and the idea that living humans could help dead souls get to heaven through their deeds. Thus, any Hallowmass activity connected to these beliefs, such as the ringing of church bells at midnight, was forbidden. But such edicts could not stop people from being genuinely concerned for the fate of their dead friends and relatives. All Hallows Eve rituals, which were once centred around the Church, became private family or community rituals. In eighteenth century Derbyshire people made bonfires on the common to 'light the souls out of Purgatory'. In nineteenth century Lancashire Catholic families still assembled at midnight on hilltops to say prayers for the dead. Legends about witches meeting at midnight on Halloween most likely have their roots in sightings by Protestants of Catholics engaging in forbidden Christian religious practices.

After the Protestants had driven Halloween away from the church, people were free to attach their own meanings and customs to it. It is not surprising that the holiday took on associations with the occult or demonic given the strong link to the dead and the strong disapproval of the Church of England. Once the connection with praying for dead ancestors in purgatory was lost, the evening took on more sinister tones in the popular imagination. The dead souls who were welcomed home at Hallomass in medieval Catholic times came to be seen as restless spirits to be feared. No doubt the spookier aspects of Halloween were also influenced by the time of year at which it occurs. Shorter days, colder nights, and dying vegetation provide a good atmosphere for tales of terror.

Customs attached to other celebrations were adopted as features of Halloween. Guising, the practice of wearing fancy dress or disguise, had been part of Christmas and New Years Eve customs in Britain and other parts of Europe since medieval times. By the nineteenth century the practice was a feature of Halloween in Scotland and Ireland. Divination and fortune-telling, another New Years Eve tradition, was a popular Halloween activity in Victorian times in various parts of Britian, no doubt due in part to the occult significance the night had acquired. In the twentieth century, as Halloween celebrations gained increasing popularity in North America, anything and everything weird, frightening or macabre could be encompassed by the holiday -- including characters from gothic literature such as Dracula and Frankenstein's monster and their on-screen equivalents. The relatively recent addition of the psychotic serial killer to the Halloween cast of characters is testimony to just how all-encompassing the holiday has become. Halloween customs are not static relics of ancient rites; they continually evolve to reflect the interests of the people who engage in them.

Also did you know ?

Since the origins of Halloween can be adequately explained with reference to Catholic All Souls Day and its Protestant prohibition, one might well ask why so many popular books, articles and web sites claim ancient pagan roots for the modern holiday. The simple answer is that in the popular imagination Druids are a lot more interesting than Catholics! Halloween conjures up images of the spooky and mysterious, so people naturally like to imagine that its origins lie in primitive occult rituals. People also tend to like simple explanations for things, whereas the historical explanations for any modern folk custom are likely to involve a lot of complex factors. The idea that ancient Celts wore disguises at Samhain to scare away evil spirits is both intriguing and simple. The real origins of Halloween fancy-dress can't be summed up in a sentence. They can only be explained with reference to other European guising customs, many of which have rather mundane connections with seasonal money-making schemes.

Most of the popular myths about the origins of Halloween can be traced back to two nineteenth century British authors: Sir John Rhys and Sir James Frazer, who speculated about connections between Halloween and pagan Celtic rituals, but provided no valid evidence to back up their claims. At the time they were writing, modern folk customs were typically seen as remnants of prehistoric religious rituals which survived among the common, uneducated country folk long after their original purpose had died out. This 'survivals theory' is widely rejected by contemporary historians, anthropologists and folklorists, who have a less romantic outlook on the past than their Victorian predecessors.

Unfortunately, nineteenth century ideas about the origins of Halloween still have widespread appeal outside of academia. This is partly due to laziness. Many people who write Halloween-themed books, articles, or TV scripts (most of which are meant primarily for entertainment) simply repeat information they've read on the web or in other popular (as opposed to scholarly) sources. They don't question what they read or bother to do any serious research into the matter. A popular Halloween book written in the 1990s might well get its material from a book written in the 1950s which gets its material from a book written in the 1890s --completely ignoring any historical studies relating to the topic that have been undertaken over the last hundred years.

Another factor that keeps the old myths about the origins of Halloween in the public eye is the specific interest of two diametrically opposed groups. Every Halloween, fundamentalist Christians and Neo-Pagan witches argue over whether or not Halloween (and all it stands for) is 'evil'. Ironically, both religious groups share and help to propagate the false assumption that the origins of Halloween are not Christian. Fundamentalist Christians repeat and add to myths about the pagan origins of Halloween in order to damn it as diabolical (to do this they also have to make ludicrous claims about Druids worshipping Satan). Wiccans (who celebrate Halloween as one of eight festivals on their 'wheel of the year') repeat and add to the myths about pagan origins of Halloween in an attempt to give ancient historical legitimacy to a twentieth century religion which is largely based on obsolete nineteenth century ideas about paganism.

Dispelling some of the myths surrounding the origins of Halloween does not take away any of the awe or mystery for those who see Halloween as a sacred time when the dead can make contact with the living --for indeed, interactions between the living and the dead were essential to All Souls Day. Nor does the truth behind the holiday detract from the entertainment of Halloween for anyone who enjoys it as a secular celebration. Halloween, as we know it today, has roots in serious medieval Christian religious beliefs about the afterlife, with five hundred years of fun and spooky secular beliefs and folk customs grafted on. It is precisely this combination of elements that gives the holiday its special appeal. Many people engage in Halloween activities with the sense that behind all the fearful fantasy they are acting out, there might be something real --that the ghostly figure they glimpsed outside the window or the unexplained rattling sound might just possibly be a soul returned from the realms of the dead. This tension between the known and unknown, the true and fantastic, the secular and sacred, is the source of our Halloween thrills. But that doesn't mean it should be the source of our Halloween facts!
The administrator has disabled public write access.
Time to create page: 0.081 seconds

Follow Us On